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Pressuring Your Sales Team Can Be Counterproductive and Three Ways to Motivate them to Success

by Scott Edinger

I just read this short blog on how not to pressure your sales team from Harvard Business Review Daily Management Tips of the Day and then found the Scott’s blog on “Three Ways to Motivate your SalesTeam.” Read the ‘Pressure’ paragraph starting below then the ‘Three Ways to Motivate.’ – Michael Griffin

Pressuring Your Sales Team
While it’s the sales team’s job to bring in business, simply cranking up the heat to get the numbers you want can backfire. Instead of dialing up the pressure, engage with sellers to help them succeed. Start by focusing on the sales process rather than the outcome. Then work with the sales team to understand where they need leadership help. This may include planning sales call strategies or discussing creative approaches to gain access to key decision-makers. Also, offer coaching. Selling often requires expertise that isn’t provided in training, so salespeople need ongoing support. Provide good models of what works. Give them a chance to practice those skills. Then give clear feedback and allow them to incorporate your feedback into their performance. If you do this not just once, but over and over again, they will hone and then master the essential skills. Remember, pressure may create diamonds out of coal, but you are working with people.

The Three Ways to Motivate Your Sales Team by Scott Edinger
It’s widely accepted that if you are in sales, you will have a quota. Achieve your quota, good job. Miss your quota, bad job. Miss your quota by a lot or miss it multiple times: no job. This creates stress for individual sellers and the sales organization as a whole.

Plenty of jobs are stressful and have objective measures of achievement. But there is a special kind of stress reserved for the sales function. When the numbers are down, the reaction from management is to turn up the heat on the sales organization. At a global technology conference last year, I asked an audience of CEOs what they do when they are behind on their numbers. “We beat on the sales team to bring in more,” one CEO immediately said. Everyone laughed. The follow-up comments and questions revealed that this approach was common across the group of 70 CEOs.

While it is the sales team’s job to bring in business, simply cranking up the heat to get the numbers you want can produce an environment where stress backfires. Too much stress in any professional situation will mask talent and lead to poor decision-making. Our ability to focus, solve problems, and accurately remember details declines dramatically in the face of excess stress. We’ve all seen it happen when someone “chokes” under pressure.

When sellers are under inordinately high pressure to close deals, they may become overly aggressive and damage (or end) promising sales cycles. Pushiness and other desperate behaviors reduce sales effectiveness and cause margins to shrink. If your team is selling any kind of complex solution, most customers will become non-responsive when pressured.

Stress can cause entire sales teams to behave as if any business is good business. Need a discount to make the deal easier? Sure! Wrong kind of prospect or problematic deal? Who cares, we have a number to make this month. The attitude is “any revenue, at any cost.” Sellers become myopically short-term focused, just as they’ve been directed. This approach has long-term consequences for the business: mounting losses and failure to create a compelling sales experience.

In an effort to produce maximum effort and create urgency in a sales organization, leadership will apply mounting pressure, drilling down on the importance of making the monthly or quarterly number. In most cases, leaders believe they are pushing hard in the spirit of driving for results. While it’s important to a point, leaders risk pushing to a point of diminishing returns.

You can clearly see how stress affects performance in the below graph, originally created by psychologists Robert Yerkes and John Dodson. Their research illuminates how performance on tasks improves with increased physiological or mental arousal. Stress does help us get the job done — but only to a point. Too little stress, and you’re in the weak performance zone; too much anxiety, and performance is impaired. In the middle, an optimal level of stress produces what we’d call peak performance. The technical term for that zone is eustress, which is exactly where leaders should set the pressure to create optimal results.

Instead of just dialing up the pressure on sales to hit the numbers, leaders can maximize performance by engaging with sellers in these three areas:

  1. Focus on creating an exceptional sales experience. The sales experience is a vital differentiator when customers evaluate their options. Research indicates that the sales experience influences approximately 25% of the decision criteria in B2B selling. The sales experience includes creating value for customers by helping them to see issues or problems they hadn’t considered, opportunities they weren’t aware of, and solutions they haven’t anticipated. This requires sales professionals to apply research, strategic thinking, and acumen to the customer’s circumstances so they can create value in the experience, beyond the product or service they are selling. These nuanced elements of the sales cycle suffer when the focus is on closing a deal within a specified period of time (month, quarter, or year-end).
  2. Focus on the sales process (not the outcome). The sales process is a road map to creating the kind of sales experience that customers value and that differentiates you from the competition. If you want to create a process that will help your sellers sell, match it to how buyers buy. In each phase of the sales process, there are a few key actions that influence whether or not an opportunity will progress to the next stage. Work with the sales team to understand where they need leadership help. This may include discussing creative approaches to gain access to key decision-makers, planning sales call strategies around critical issues and investing in SMEs to support the sales process and demonstrate capabilities.
  3. Focus on coaching to improve performance. Consultative selling of sophisticated solutions requires expertise that is never fully developed in training programs. It requires skill development from practice in real situations, which comes from coaching. When leaders focus on building sales talent, they are investing in a competitive advantage for the business. Leaders can provide good models of what to do, followed by practice, clear feedback on specific skill improvements, and follow-up to incorporate feedback into performance —not just once, but over and over again as a skill set is honed to proficiency and then mastered.

As a leader, you have the greatest influence on the stress levels of your team. Pressure may create diamonds out of coal, but you are working with people. Getting results is the primary objective, but incessantly pushing for sales to hit a number can have diminishing returns. The downstream effects may also be hazardous to the overall health of your business. Focus your efforts on actually making people better at their jobs, building capability for improved performance, and the numbers will follow.

Follow these three simple ways and see your sales team perform.

Michael J Griffin
Founder ELAvate
Global Sales Coach
MHG Sales Trainer

Posted in sales motivation, Sales Performance, Sales Team

About Michael Griffin

Michael is the CEO of ELAvate Global and Equipping Leaders for Asia Pte. Ltd. Over 40+ years, his career has revolved around developing leaders, especially sales leaders, in emerging nations. Mr. Griffin has spent the majority of his 40+ year career in Asia. His areas of expertise include Sales Productivity, Senior Executive Development, Cross Cultural Leadership, Strategy Mapping and Balanced Scorecard.

2020 is Near – Are You Ready for a Great Year?

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By Michael J Griffin, Founder ELAvate, John Maxwell Team Founder, Executive ELAvate Coach

With 2020 on a few weeks away, it is time to reflect on 2019 and prepare for a more significant 2020. Here are ten questions for you to think about the past year.

  1. What life changes did you go through in 2019? What did you learn about yourself, relationships and life?
  2. List your top three accomplishments for 2019 and the impact on you and others.
  3. How would you score yourself on each of these: teachability, humility, forgiveness and patience?
  4. How was your life “balance” in 2019? Where was it in or out of balance?
  5. What goals or projects did you achieve in 2019? How do you feel about the achievements?
  6. What goals did you not accomplish in 2019? What have you learned?
  7. How generous were you last year? What did you give, do for others? How did you feel?
  8. What mistakes, regrets or failures did you make in 2019? What was the outcome for you? Did you fail forward?
  9. Evaluate yourself on your physical and spiritual health.
  10. Were you able to flourish in your life purpose or calling? What were the accelerators or obstacles in your calling?

Your reflection and vision for 2020 sets the stage for you to determine your journey to significance. I have created for you a Lego House Goal Sheet that helps you plan and list out your life mission, values and goals for 2020. You ask “Lego House,” what do you mean?”

I do not believe in life balance. Most people will balance one key aspect of their life against all others. For example, you find sales people and CEO’s put their personal or company revenue targets at the expense of all other areas of their life: health, family come to mind. I call this the “Running the Rat Race.”

Instead why not lead a wholesome life that is integrated across the “Lego” building blocks that “houses” your goals to reach real success and significance?

Click on the link here to download our ELAvate Lego House 2020 Goal Sheet and explore, reflect, change and commit to integrated goals for a more wholesome life of significance in 2020.

If you need my insight, help or coaching on Your calling, vision, focus and goals for 2020, email me michael.griffin@elavateglobal.com

Begin your 2019 reflection and start planning for a more fruitful 2020!

Have a great week!

Michael J Griffin
Founder ELAvate
John Maxwell Team Founder
Executive ELAvate Coach

Posted in Character, Sales Leadership, sales motivation, Sales Strategy

About Michael Griffin

Michael is the CEO of ELAvate Global and Equipping Leaders for Asia Pte. Ltd. Over 40+ years, his career has revolved around developing leaders, especially sales leaders, in emerging nations. Mr. Griffin has spent the majority of his 40+ year career in Asia. His areas of expertise include Sales Productivity, Senior Executive Development, Cross Cultural Leadership, Strategy Mapping and Balanced Scorecard.

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Top sales leadership skills needed to develop top performing salespeople

by GrowthPlay Library

If you want a top performing sales organization, you need the consistent ability to coach and enable salespeople to success. Providing motivation is a component, but results come when your managers have a cadence that helps them minimize administrative burdens, while providing continuous and effective coaching that does one thing – delivers revenue and enables sales results.

Your managers are a pivotal part to the success over your sales organization. Here are the top sales leadership skills they need to develop and execute.

Top Sales Leadership Skills Managers Need to Develop and Execute

Don’t Just Give the What, Provide the How

It doesn’t do any good to have a team of sales managers that force tasks without explaining how to do them or more importantly, the value of doing them. One of the best sales leadership skills your managers can develop is the ability to consistently provide the how. Knowing where a sales rep is coming up short is one thing.

Effectively conveying how the rep needs to improve is another, and can often be a challenge for sales managers. Don’t just tell your reps to have more meetings with the C-suite. Give them the tools, content and the skills to have high-level sales conversations that earn them those meetings.

Provide Effective Feedback

It’s easy to see where a sales rep may need improving. However, the ability to provide direction that helps him/her clearly understand how to improve is a top sales leadership skill. The key to giving great feedback is to do it in a way that motivates and builds confidence. Here are some easy techniques to use in any feedback session:

  • Have the rep first say what he/she did well and then where he/she needs to improve. Allowing them to go first helps you understand what think. Typically, the rep will also bring up those negative points which gives you the opportunity to coach instead of being critical.
  • When you do have to speak about negatives, do it in terms of “what you would do differently”. Focus on what the rep needs to do moving forward.
  • Ensure there are clear action items at the end of the conversation. Again, don’t just give the what. Provide the how.

Ensure Relevancy

Top sales leaders have the ability to demonstrate value and make any new initiative relative to the sales rep. Rolling out a new CRM system, a new sales process, even a new territory review cadence requires sales managers demonstrate why the change is relevant to what the reps are doing every day.  They need to see the value in the change and understand what’s in it for them.

Protect the Job

Bottom line, no matter the organization, sales reps are charged with one priority – sell more, faster. Arguably, the sales leadership skill with the most impact is the ability to protect the time salespeople need to sell. Assuming you have the right sales talent on board, the more time your salespeople can spend on building pipeline and move opportunities to closed-won deals, the more successful you’re sales organization will be.

Demonstrate Desired Behaviors

The best sales leaders lead from the front. You can’t tell people what to do and then leave for your 11am tee time. You need to demonstrate the behaviors you want in your sales organization. For example, if it’s critically important that salespeople adopt a new methodology, you need to demonstrate how you are leveraging the methodology. Promote the content and inspect its use. Your managers will do the same and so will the reps. Remember, leadership cannot be delegated.

In First, Break All the Rules, Marcus Buckingham writes,

“The talented employee may join a company because of its charismatic leaders, its generous benefits, and its world-class training programs, but how long that employee stays and how productive he/she is while they are there is determined by the relationship with their immediate supervisor.”

Top sales leadership skills can be taught and learned, but ultimately it’s owning the leadership and the critical role you have in the company that drives productivity and creates a culture of success.

Posted in Sales Coaching, Sales Leadership

About Michael Griffin

Michael is the CEO of ELAvate Global and Equipping Leaders for Asia Pte. Ltd. Over 40+ years, his career has revolved around developing leaders, especially sales leaders, in emerging nations. Mr. Griffin has spent the majority of his 40+ year career in Asia. His areas of expertise include Sales Productivity, Senior Executive Development, Cross Cultural Leadership, Strategy Mapping and Balanced Scorecard.

20170104104338-shutterstock-356792267 Sales Coaching

Sales Coaching – Who is Doing it?

By Tamara Schenk of CSO Insights, an ELAvate Sales Research Partner

ELAvate has been working with sales organizations across Asia to improve the attitude and ability of sales managers to get revenue results through effective sales coaching. One size does not fit all as outlined in this article by Tamara Schenck of CSO Insights, our ELAvate sales research partner. Her global research gives insight on what might be the best approach for your sales coaching approach.

When it comes to sales coaching, we usually discuss the approaches that have been taken, the impact different approaches create and what organizations that don’t implement sales coaching the right way miss out on in terms of performance.

We usually assume that sales managers should be coaching their salespeople and that all enablement activities to develop coaching skills should be targeted to sales managers. In our 5th CSO Annual Sales Enablement Study, we wanted to better understand who is coaching your sellers.

Sales coaching is delivered by various roles; sales managers only deliver 66.5% of the coaching.

Interestingly, 29.5% of organizations indicated that their sales enablement teams coach sellers directly, which means they have to get enabled first to be able to coach salespeople.

Another 18.9% work with external sales coaches, and 12.6% work with field sales coaches which is our focus today.

What does this variety of coaching sources mean for you as a sales enablement leader?

Before we go into any recommendations, there is no right or wrong approach per se. And there definitely is not a “right one” based on opinion or belief. What counts at the end of the day, looking at your charter and the metrics you have to achieve, is that you implement sales coaching in a way that delivers the best possible results in the shortest amount of time in your organization.

Based on that pragmatic clarity, it’s much easier to think through your current situation without having tons of limiting beliefs in your head. It’s about assessing what makes sense in the context of your organization. If you have sales managers who are not developed as sales coaches and were never required to coach their sellers, then you may think about working with external sales coaches, followed by developing internal field sales coaches.

In case you have a highly engaged group of sales managers already developed and equipped to be great sales coaches, you may follow this path and implement a dynamic coaching process to get into a sales coaching routine and cadence.

Your organization most likely is somewhere in-between. That means you have a small group of sales managers who are already coaching their sellers effectively, and you have a bigger group of sales managers who never had anything to do with sales coaching and either claim that they are already doing it (but that it’s not working!) or are more than skeptical when it comes to sales coaching in the first place. Let’s narrow this down a bit and look at their results and what other criteria might play a role.

Big Idea! Specialization seems to matter. Field sales coaches and external sales coaches typically achieve better results than sales managers.

This is a very interesting finding. Segmenting the data by these different coaching roles, one could assume that it’s a no-brainer to focus on field sales coaches and/or external sales coaches to get quick results, as their results were, on average, higher than coaching sales managers. However, this is only half true because context matters all of the time, including here. The organization’s sales coaching approach makes all the difference.

Context matters: Putting field sales coaches or external sales coaches in a random coaching approach only creates average win rates.

Context matters: Putting sales managers in a random coaching approach is even worse, as win rates are 4.5 points below average.

These findings help a lot to develop a targeted and tailored approach in your organization. They simply say that there is no real shortcut to immediate sales coaching success. In such a random environment – with no sales coaching approach, process or culture – all coaching roles have a hard time succeeding.

Regarding quota attainment, sales managers and specialized sales coaches delivered the same average performance, plus/minus 60.0%. There was a noticeable difference, however, regarding win rates. As expected, sales managers with no sales coaching expertise (that’s what defines the random approach) ended up with win rates 4.5 points below the study’s average of 46.4%. Instead, the specialized and skilled sales coaches could achieve average win rates even in a random environment. It makes sense, as they have more expertise and often more time and can better focus their efforts on specific opportunities and accounts to help sellers win more deals.

Context matters: In a formal or dynamic sales coaching approach, sales managers and sales coaches both achieve significantly better results than average.

This comes as no surprise. As we see in our data year after year, a formal or dynamic sales coaching approach drives sales performance in an impressive way; overall win rate improvements were 19.0% this year, compared to the study’s average of 46.4%. Given such a foundation – where processes and guidelines are implemented and managers/coaches are required to coach sellers – sales performance is significantly better, as you can see here.

Segmenting the data by coaching role, sales coaches (external/field) achieved win rates of 54.3%, and sales managers (in the same environment) achieved win rates of 51.8%. Both are outstanding results. Both are double-digit improvements (17.0% and 11.6% increase, compared to the study’s average).

How to get started as a sales enablement leader

Assuming you are facing a random sales coaching approach in your organization, check internally to see if there are field sales coaches somewhere in the organization. If not, it might make sense to work with external sales coaches in a specific way. They can help you run successful coaching pilots and, as discussed here, they can create better results, even in a random environment. At the same time, they should help you create and implement a sales coaching process in your organization.

Doing these things in parallel, you can create evidence with a pilot, which is the ultimate key to success, as results will help you get your investment needs approved. Results will make it much easier to create the necessary momentum to drive the transformation toward a coaching culture. While doing that, you also can develop coaching skills with your sales managers and internal field sales coaches.

Effective sales enablement leaders know that there is no shortcut to sales coaching success. But they also know that working with all available options, such as leveraging the potential of external and field sales coaches, can speed up the journey and help propel them from bad performance to average performance. Then, with the implementation of the right coaching environment, all coaching roles will succeed and achieve significantly better results.

We at ELAvate are Asian experts at upskilling your sales managers, providing external sales coaching to your sales teams, and conducting assessments on the health of sales teams. Call us for a no obligation discussion. We can support your success in 2020.

Have a great week!
Michael J Griffin
ELAvate Sales Coach
MHG Master Sales Trainer

Posted in Sales Coaching

About Michael Griffin

Michael is the CEO of ELAvate Global and Equipping Leaders for Asia Pte. Ltd. Over 40+ years, his career has revolved around developing leaders, especially sales leaders, in emerging nations. Mr. Griffin has spent the majority of his 40+ year career in Asia. His areas of expertise include Sales Productivity, Senior Executive Development, Cross Cultural Leadership, Strategy Mapping and Balanced Scorecard.

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Why Generosity is Good for Business. (Adapted from GrowthPlay Blog)

By Michael J Griffin, ELAvate Founder, GrowthPlay Partner

A few years ago, I travelled to Atlanta, Georgia to meet the John Maxwell Team on expanding their leadership training across Asia. After we sat down for lunch, the then CEO, John Hull’s  first question he asked my team was “How may we help you? This moment of truth has stuck with me, that in sales and service relationships, we all need a mind-set of how can we help our clients be successful through being gracious serving, and generous.

GrowthPlay has written a blog on generosity in sales. Here is a summary of what they found. A recent article published by the Greater Good Science Center at the University of California at Berkeley gathers the results of several studies to demonstrate five ways in which giving is actually good for you: It makes you happy, is good for your health, promotes cooperation and social connection, evokes gratitude, and is contagious. While we tend to view generosity as an act of altruism, it turns out the giver actually gains measurable benefits in the process as well.

Here at ELAvate, we coach our clients to think of sales as an act of service. Instead of viewing sales through a narrow transactional lens—asking, “What can this client do for me?”—we challenge our sales people to expand their view of interactions with colleagues, clients, and potential clients. By asking instead, “What can I do for this person?” and acting in the spirit of service without necessarily knowing whether that decision will pay off now or down the line, sales people can create new energy and new possibilities and I believe a competitive advantage of being a sales person that cares about his/her customers.

Let’s list out the generosity benefits listed in the Berkeley article onto the business context. Acts of generosity in your work interactions are good for business because:

Giving makes you happier. It’s as simple as that: helping others makes you feel good, which makes you happier. And clients like to work with happy people.

Giving is good for your health. Studies show that generous behaviors reduce stress hormones, among other physiological benefits. Stress interferes with clear thinking and long-term decision making. Less stress will make you better at your sales job.

Giving promotes social connection. No matter what business you’re in, referrals are likely your number-one source of new business. Giving creates good will and good word of mouth for you and your services. This is especially true in Asia where “Guanxi or Hubungan” are crucial to building trust to close the sale.

Giving evokes gratitude. As you act in service to others, your gratitude for your current clients and the projects you have the chance to work on will grow. That gratitude may even lead to new ideas for how you can serve your clients even better.

Giving is contagious. Your acts of generosity will inspire others to be generous too—generous to you and generous to yet more people, who will in turn give to others. In short, you could start a chain reaction within your field that inspires colleagues and clients to be gracious themselves.

It may not be easy to immediately quantify the results of generous behavior in terms of conversions and billings, but science does point to the tangible personal and social benefits of giving. It’s easy to see how embracing this new way of thinking—sales as an act of service—could drive real growth in the long term.

Have a Gracious Generous week!

Posted in Sales Talent, Success

About Michael Griffin

Michael is the CEO of ELAvate Global and Equipping Leaders for Asia Pte. Ltd. Over 40+ years, his career has revolved around developing leaders, especially sales leaders, in emerging nations. Mr. Griffin has spent the majority of his 40+ year career in Asia. His areas of expertise include Sales Productivity, Senior Executive Development, Cross Cultural Leadership, Strategy Mapping and Balanced Scorecard.

Korn-Ferry

Some Very Interesting News – Korn Ferry Acquires Miller Heiman Group and Achieve Forum

by Michael J Griffin, ELAvate Founder, MHG and AF Distributor since 1992

Yesterday morning I awoke to some very interesting news! My two principals, Miller Heiman Group – MHG (AchieveGlobal sales training before) and Achieve Forum – AF (AchieveGlobal Leadership training before) were acquired by Korn Ferry, the very large human resource consulting company. This merger will only begin next year and could bring some robust additions to the library of training and consulting we have at ELAvate. Remember ELAvate is an Asian Distributor for both MHG and AF solutions since 1992. Here is the press release:

KORN FERRY ENTERS INTO DEFINITIVE AGREEMENT TO ACQUIRE THREE LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT COMPANIES
September 30, 2019
Combination Bolsters Learning & Development and Training Offerings

LOS ANGELES–Sep. 30, 2019– Korn Ferry (NYSE: KFY) today announced that it has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire three companies from TwentyEighty, Inc. in the leadership development area: Miller Heiman Group, AchieveForum, and Strategy Execution. The transaction, which is subject to customary closing conditions, is expected to close by November 1.

“The combination brings a world-class portfolio of learning, development, and performance improvement offerings and expertise to Korn Ferry and will bolster our firm’s substantial leadership development capabilities,” said Gary D. Burnison, CEO, Korn Ferry.
Byron Matthews of Miller Heiman Group, Christoffer Ellehuus of Strategy Execution, and Scott Bohannon of AchieveForum said: “We are delighted to find the perfect strategic home at Korn Ferry. We are enthusiastic about what the future will bring from this acquisition in terms of synergistic product and consulting solution offerings for our customers as well as career opportunities for our employees.”

Miller Heiman Group specializes in transforming sales performance and customer experience. AchieveForum offers frontline leadership development. Strategy Execution provides organizational and project management training. Combined, the three companies have trained thousands of professionals and hundreds of clients across the globe and have substantial expertise in sales performance and customer experience, frontline leadership development, and project management, which will greatly benefit future clients.
These companies will be part of a newly branded Korn Ferry Digital (formerly the Products Group), which, working closely with Consulting, will provide clients direct access to data, insights and analytics from one of the world’s most comprehensive people and organizational databases. The addition of these three companies is expected to further expand Korn Ferry’s vast intellectual property and content and leverage the firm’s digital delivery platforms.

The broader corporate training and education market is a greater than $300 billion global market opportunity, which includes retraining employees to meet the changing demands of today’s dynamic business landscape. The acquisition of the three businesses is expected to accelerate Korn Ferry’s ability to capture a share of this significant market.
Terms of the deal were not disclosed. The acquisition is expected to be accretive to adjusted earnings in the first year of Korn Ferry’s ownership.

About Korn Ferry
Korn Ferry is a global organizational consulting firm. We work with clients to design their organizational structures, roles, and responsibilities. We help them hire the right people and advise them on how to reward, develop, and motivate their workforce. And, we help professionals navigate and advance their careers.

Our relation with you an ELAvate client will remain the same. Let’s see what positive changes this acquisition brings in 2020.

Michael J Griffin
ELAvate Founder
MHG and AF Distributor since 1992

Posted in Success

About Michael Griffin

Michael is the CEO of ELAvate Global and Equipping Leaders for Asia Pte. Ltd. Over 40+ years, his career has revolved around developing leaders, especially sales leaders, in emerging nations. Mr. Griffin has spent the majority of his 40+ year career in Asia. His areas of expertise include Sales Productivity, Senior Executive Development, Cross Cultural Leadership, Strategy Mapping and Balanced Scorecard.

DrFons5

The Seven Dimensions of Culture Certification Workshop By Dr. Fons Trompenaars in Singapore!

I normally do not use my blog space to “promote” but this is an excellent exception. In 1994, I read the book “Riding the Waves of Culture” by Dr. Fons Trompenaars. This book and it’s exposition of Seven Dimensions of Culture have been crucial in my success to lead, manage and sell across cultures. Harvard Business Review cites Dr. Trompenaars as one of the top 3 cross cultural experts in the business world.

Dr. Trompenaars is coming to Singapore on September 30th and October 1st to conduct his world renowned certification for you to train the Seven Dimensions of Culture. If you work across cultures – national, ethnic or organizational cultures this workshop is a must for your personal growth.

The flyer of this THT certification and investment can be downloaded by clicking on this THT Certification Details and Pricing.

Please find an informative video on Linkedin for this certification here

Registration is by Google Forms here

Dr. Trompenaars’ website is www.thtconsulting.com

I have been a certified as a THT Seven Dimensions Trainer since 1995 and have attended at least two more because of their usefulness in my role as a cross cultural leader. I strongly believe you will become a more competent global leader from this highly interactive and entertaining workshop. Please note I receive no compensation from THT or Dr. Trompenaars for promoting this excellent workshop! Sign up as seats are limited!

Have a Great Week Leading Across Cultures!

Michael J Griffin

THT Trainer since 1995

ELAvate Founder

Former US Peace Corps Volunteer

Posted in Communication, Tools

About Michael Griffin

Michael is the CEO of ELAvate Global and Equipping Leaders for Asia Pte. Ltd. Over 40+ years, his career has revolved around developing leaders, especially sales leaders, in emerging nations. Mr. Griffin has spent the majority of his 40+ year career in Asia. His areas of expertise include Sales Productivity, Senior Executive Development, Cross Cultural Leadership, Strategy Mapping and Balanced Scorecard.

Screenshot_2019-09-05 Consultative Selling - The hardest and easiest way to sell

Consultative Selling – The hardest and easiest way to sell

Gitomer

 by Jeffrey Gitomer

What do you get when you combine a salesperson with a consultant? The most powerful method of selling.

Don’t fight the title “Salesperson,” “Sales Representative” or Account Executive.” Abandon it. If you’re willing to put forth the effort it takes to be a consultative salesperson, you can move from ordinary to extraordinary.

As an experienced salesperson you have already developed a personal sales style, and have achieved some degree of selling success. Consultative selling combines your personality, sales skills, and interpersonal skills into a style that makes prospects most likely to buy.

Consultative selling has 5.5 primary components:

  1. Finding and understanding the customer’s needs.
  2. Partnering with the customer making the transition from being a salesperson to becoming a resource.
  3. Helping customers achieve their business objectives through the use of your product or service.
  4. Belief that your business, product and service are the best.
  5. Belief in yourself, and that you are the best.

5.5 A positive attitude about yourself, your product, and your customer that makes the first five components work to everyone’s benefit.

There are no steps to learn, this is not a technique. Consultative Selling is a style and strategy…as a successful salesperson, you must know the science of selling. This process assumes you have that knowledge. The Consultative Selling approach will strengthen and enhance your selling technique.

Here are the 16.5 basic elements of Consultative Selling…

1. Positive attitude: The first rule of life. An “I can do it” state of mind that is with you all the time. A happiness that makes others want to spend time with you.

2. The ability to set and meet goals: The true professional is a dedicated, well-disciplined and self directed professional.

3. Taking pride in what you do: Pride shows. It has an enthusiasm that attracts people to you and your business.

4. Being able to accept responsibility: Customers want someone who will take ownership in all transactions. An “I’ll handle it personally” person.

5. Being able to listen: Your customer wants to tell you what he needs and how to sell him. Just use the right questions and listen to understand.

6. Confidence in your abilities: Confidence in what you do and who you are breeds confidence to buy what you sell.

7. Knowledge of your business: A given for any professional in any field.

8. Knowledge of your customer’s business: A prerequisite for having an intelligent conversation with a prospect, and your best chance to build credibility.

9. Advance knowledge of your customer: Preplan all sales calls. The competitive edge in selling. The more you know about your customer in advance, the better equipped you are to serve and the more impressive you’ll be.

10. Personal success experiences: Your ability to feel success within yourself and relate success to your customer builds your character.

11. A strong desire to help others: The second rule of life and business success. The caveat is that you must help without expectation or keeping score.

12. Excellent communication skills: Speaking, listening, writing. Delivering and receiving a clear message is at the heart of the selling process.

13. Personal ethics: Hard work, truthfulness, being sincere, and living up to your commitments…every day.

14. The ability to ask intelligent questions Ask the customer for information that only he or she knows such as their goals and objectives, who their customers are, how they do business, budgets and how they intend to achieve their objectives. Ask questions that set you apart from others.

15. Being able to understand, relate to and fulfill customers needs:  Success in sales depends on understanding and service to the customer. He needs to be understood, he wants to be befriended, and he expects to be served. Now.

16. The ability to establish and maintain long term relationships: The true consultative salesperson will make short term sacrifice for longterm gain…every time.

16.5 Your desire to succeed: One element that binds all the others together…One element that measures success every morning in the mirror…your mirror.

These attributes and skills must be present in any successful consultative sales person. What you do with these skills and how you apply them, is what makes you a valued, trusted resource to your customers and prospects. A consultant.

Jeffrey Gitomer,  @GITOMER, KING OF SALES, The author of thirteen best-selling books including The Sales Bible, The Little Red Book of Selling, and The Little Gold Book of Yes! Attitude.

Posted in Consultative Selling

About Michael Griffin

Michael is the CEO of ELAvate Global and Equipping Leaders for Asia Pte. Ltd. Over 40+ years, his career has revolved around developing leaders, especially sales leaders, in emerging nations. Mr. Griffin has spent the majority of his 40+ year career in Asia. His areas of expertise include Sales Productivity, Senior Executive Development, Cross Cultural Leadership, Strategy Mapping and Balanced Scorecard.

Pile of question marks and magnifying glass

A Probing Primer – A Review of Good Question Skills

by Michael J Griffin, Founder ELAvate Sales, MHG Master Sales Trainer for 35 years

“If you can’t ask good questions, you will never be a great sales person.” Jeffry Gitomer
“Good sales people ask great questions.” Adapted from John Maxwell

Let’s review and upgrade your ability to ask great questions by reviewing the different types of probes you can employ to gain customer trust, relevant information, needs to achieve better win-win decisions for you and your customers.

Open Probes
Open probes allow the customer to respond freely, and answer anyway he or she likes. They show respect, build trust and can gain a lot of information. The downside is they may lead to irrelevant information.

What are the reasons for the change in strategy?
What is your perspective on the situation?
Why do you say that you are concerned about……?
Tell me more about…..
Please elaborate more on…..
What do you mean?

Closed Probes
Closed probes direct the customer to a ‘yes’ or ‘no,’ a choice you supply, or a single fact. They gain specific information and are normally used when customers are trusting you enough to reveal more detailed information. The downside is they may lead to wrong assumptions on your part or the customer may feel interrogated if you ask too many.

Do you think you can meet the deadline?
Can you get me that information?
When will you start the project?
How many items do you require?
Do you wantto go to Chicago or Shanghai?

Confirming Probes
These probes are to ensure you understand what and why the client has said. They show you are intent on listening or confirm customer needs or requirements.

You need to solve this productivity problem to meet production quota. Am I correct?
You require the delivery to three construction sites, correct?
So what you need is a quick solution but still meet cost constraints. Is this correct?

Collaborative Probes
Sometimes you need the client to “open his/her mind” to collaborate or problem solve without being pushy. Collaborative probes do this very well.

Can we explore how we might…..
Have you considered…….
What if…..
Have you compared…..
Let’s evaluate the alternatives.
If budget wasn’t an issue, how might you solve this problem?

Impact Probes
Impact questions get the customer thinking about the consequences of not changing or implementing a change you are suggesting. They get the customer thinking about the effect of solving or not solving a problem.

What might be the impact of not hiring enough staff?
How might your customer service improve if…….?
What are the effects of poor quality on your company image?
Do you see any consequences of not meeting year end targets?
How do you feel about this situation?

Checking Probes
Checking probes are very useful in cross cultural communication settings or when the client is distracted. They are to help make sure “the customer is on the bus” with you.

How does that sound?
Is that OK with you?
Any issues?
Can we move ahead?
Anything else?

A thoughtful combination of using these probes with customers allows you to be consultative with the customer in a way that you are seen as a problem solver focused on the customer and  his her success. Successful sales people ask great questions!

Have a great week asking great questions!

Michael J Griffin
Founder ELAvate Sales
MHG Master Sales Trainer for 35 years

Posted in Probing Strategies

About Michael Griffin

Michael is the CEO of ELAvate Global and Equipping Leaders for Asia Pte. Ltd. Over 40+ years, his career has revolved around developing leaders, especially sales leaders, in emerging nations. Mr. Griffin has spent the majority of his 40+ year career in Asia. His areas of expertise include Sales Productivity, Senior Executive Development, Cross Cultural Leadership, Strategy Mapping and Balanced Scorecard.

Attitude is everything

The 9 Dimensions of a Great Sales Attitude

by Michael J Griffin, Founder ELAvate!, MHG Master Sales Trainer, John Maxwell Team Founder

Your sales attitude can be the most important factor in your success or failure as a career sales person. Just saying “ a good attitude is important” is clearly not enough. Your attitude spans a number of dimensions that synergize to make you sales super star. Let’s review the 9 Dimensions of a Great Sales Attitude and select quotes to energize you in each dimension.

Winning Attitude
“Motivation will almost always beat mere talent.” Norman Ralph Augustine
“Attitude is not the only thing, but with all else being equal, it is the main thing.” John Maxwell
“Don’t let what you cannot do interfere with what you can do.” John R. Wooden
“Champions keep playing until they get it right.” Billie Jean King
“Yesterday’s home runs don’t win today’s games.” Babe Ruth
“Winning isn’t getting ahead of others. It’s getting ahead of yourself.” Robert Staubach

Ethical Attitude
“Be humble in your confidence yet courageous in your character.” Melanie Koulouris
“I believe the first test of a truly great man is in his humility.” John Ruskin
“Relativity applies to physics, not ethics.” Albert Einstein
“Integrity is telling myself the truth. And honesty is telling the truth to other people.” Spencer Johnson
“Winning is nice if you don’t lose your integrity in the process.” Arnold Horshack

Fail Forward Attitude
“You miss 100% of the shots you don’t take.” Wayne Gretzky
“Fall down seven times and stand up eight.” Ancient Proverb
“Success is never final. Failure is never fatal. It is courage that counts.” Winston Churchill
“In the middle of every difficulty lies opportunity.” Albert Einstein
“I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.” Thomas A. Edison
“Show me a person who has never made a mistake and I’ll show you someone who has never achieved much.” Joan Collins

Persistent Attitude
“Our greatest weakness lies in giving up. The most certain way to succeed is always to try just one more time.” Thomas Edison
“The difference between a successful person and others is not a lack of strength, not a lack of knowledge, but rather a lack of will.” Vince Lombardi
“Success is almost totally dependent upon drive and persistence.” Denis Waitley
“If you have mastered your profession but lack the ability to be persistent, you will not succeed.” Dozie Uzochukwu

Achievement Attitude
“Don’t be afraid to give up the good to go for the great.” John D. Rockefeller
“Whether you think you can or you think you can’t, you’re right.” Henry Ford
“You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream.” C.S. Lewis
“Spectacular achievement is always preceded by unspectacular preparation.” Robert Schuller

Serving Attitude
“Everybody can be great, because everybody can serve.” Martin Luther King Jr.
“Life is an exciting business and most exciting when lived for others.” Helen Keller
“Servant leadership propels sales success.” Adapted from Ken Blanchard

Positive Attitude
“Your attitude, not your aptitude, will determine your altitude.” Zig Ziglar
“If you’re going through hell, keep going.” Winston Churchill
“Optimism is a happiness magnet. If you stay positive, good things and good people will be drawn to you.” Mary Lou Retton
“Attitude is a little thing that makes a big difference.” Winston Churchill
“Change your thoughts and you change your world.” Norman Vincent Peale

Teachable Attitude
“Be willing to be a beginner every single morning.” Meister Eckhart
“It is possible to be confident and still practice humility. Be confident in the success of the teachable.” Russell Kyle
“To be humble is to be teachable.” Richard G. Scott
“Teachability is not so much about competence and mental capacity as it is about attitude. It is the desire to listen, learn, and apply. It is the hunger to discover and grow. It is the willingness to learn, unlearn, and relearn.” John Maxwell
“It’s what you learn after you know it all that counts.” John Wooden

Creative Attitude
“Innovation distinguishes between a leader and a follower.” Steve Jobs
“What differentiates sellers today is their ability to bring fresh ideas.” Jill Konrath
“Things work out best for those who make the best of how things work out.” John Wooden
“The best way to predict the future is to create it.” Abraham Lincoln

Paste these quotes on your wall, put them in your handphone. Read and keep focused on your attitude for sales success to get out there and win!

Posted in Attitude, Sales Team

About Michael Griffin

Michael is the CEO of ELAvate Global and Equipping Leaders for Asia Pte. Ltd. Over 40+ years, his career has revolved around developing leaders, especially sales leaders, in emerging nations. Mr. Griffin has spent the majority of his 40+ year career in Asia. His areas of expertise include Sales Productivity, Senior Executive Development, Cross Cultural Leadership, Strategy Mapping and Balanced Scorecard.

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